"Parent Child Interaction Therapy - also known as PCIT - is an evidence-based treatment program designed for caregivers and their young children (2 to 7 years old) who are experiencing social, behavioral, and/or emotional difficulties.

PCIT is regarded by national expert panels as a gold standard treatment for children who have any of the following challenges:

  • Frequent temper tantrums

  • Defiance - refusing to follow directions

  • Verbal and/or physical aggression

  • Destruction of toys and/or family belongings

  • Backtalk or sassing adults

  • Whining or crying for no apparent reason

  • Constantly seeking attention

  • Hyperactivity

  • Interrupting others

  • Short attention span

  • Difficulty with behaviors at school, preschool, and/or daycare"  (www.parentchildinteractiontherapy.com/what-is-pcit)

Research

Lieneman, C. C., Girard, E. I., Quetsch, L. B., & McNeil, C. B. (2020).  The impact of incentives on treatment adherence and attrition: A randomized controlled trial of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with a primarily Latinx, low-income population.

 

Quetsch, L. B., Girard, E. I., & McNeil, C. B. (2020).  An Evaluation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy With and Without Motivational Enhancement to Reduce Attrition.

 

Webb, H. J., Thomas, R., McGregor, L., Avdagic, E., & Zimmer-Gembeck, M. J. (2017)  An Evaluation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy With and Without Motivational Enhancement to Reduce Attrition (abstract)Outcomes of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy in an urban community clinic: A comparison of treatment completers and dropouts.

 

Danko, C.M., Garbecz, L.L., & Budd, K.S. (2016)  Outcomes of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy in an urban community clinic: A comparison of treatment completers and dropouts.

 

Danko, C.M., Garbecz, L.L., & Budd, K.S. (2016)  Parent-Child Interaction Therapy in a Community Setting: Explaining Outcomes, Attrition, and Treatment Setting.

 

Lanier, P., Kohl, P. L., Benz, J., Swinger, D., Moussette, P., & Drake, B. (2011) A motivational intervention can improve retention in PCIT for low-motivation child welfare clients.

 

Chaffin M., Valle L. A., Funderburk B., Gurwitch R., Silovsky J., Bard D., McCoy C., Kees M. (2009) Predicting treatment and follow-up attrition in Parent-Child Interaction Therapy.

 

Fernandez, M. A., & Eyberg, S. M. (2009) Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: An Examination of Cost Effectiveness.

 

Goldfine, M. E., Wagner, S. M., Branstetter, S. A., & McNeil, C. B. (2008) Predicting outcome in Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Success and attrition.

 

Werba, B., Eyberg, S.M., Boggs, S.R., & Algina, J. (2006)  Keeping families in once they’ve come through the door: Attrition in Parent-Child Interaction Therapy.

Pade, H., Taube, D. O., Aalborg, A. E., & Reiser, P. J. (2006)  Outcomes of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Mothers' reports of maintenance three to six years after treatment.

 

Hood, K. K., & Eyberg, S. M. (2003)  Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with behavior problem children: One and two year maintenance of treatment effects in the family.